June 14, 2024
The galaxy system ZS7 as seen by the James Webb Space Telescope, revealing the most distant colliding quasars ever seen. (Image credit: ESA/Webb, NASA, CSA, J. Dunlop, D. Magee, P. G. Pérez-González, H. Übler, R. Maiolino, et. al)

James Webb Space Telescope spots most distant and oldest black hole collision ever seen (video)

“Our results also show that massive black holes have been shaping the evolution of galaxies from the very beginning.”

Using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), astronomers have found the most distant merger between supermassive black holes ever detected.

The colliding black holes are at the heart of merging galaxies that are so distant that the collision is seen as it was happening just 740 million years after the Big Bang when the 13.8 billion-year-old universe was a fraction of its current age.

The JWST has been regularly uncovering supermassive black holes in the infant universe, which has been a problem because the merger process that facilitates their growth should take periods in excess of a billion years. These results could also help solve the troubling mystery of how supermassive black holes grew to tremendous masses so early in the history of the universe.

“Our findings suggest that merging is an important route through which black holes can rapidly grow, even at cosmic dawn,” research leader and University of Cambridge scientist Hannah Übler said in a statement. “Together with other Webb findings of active, massive black holes in the distant universe, our results also show that massive black holes have been shaping the evolution of galaxies from the very beginning.”

Interesting Read…

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