June 17, 2024
Alberta pension a serious idea that would flip out the feds
If Alberta quits the national plan, payments from other Canadians would apparently have to rise about 10 per cent to protect benefits. That number will catch Ottawa’s attention.
If Alberta quits the national plan, payments from other Canadians would apparently have to rise about 10 per cent to protect benefits. That number will catch Ottawa’s attention.

The UCP is winding up to make one of the biggest demands ever aimed at Ottawa.

Premier Jason Kenney’s letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau might say: “Send Alberta a cheque for $40 billion. We are leaving the Canada Pension Plan.”

For several days now, Kenney and the UCP government have been dropping hints like clanging manhole covers.

And public interest appears to be very high in the prospect of Pexit.

Herald contributor Rob Breakenridge fostered much of the curiosity Tuesday with a thoughtful column on why an Alberta Pension Plan is worth considering.

On Oct. 29, Kenney talked frankly about leaving the Canada Pension Plan and forming an Alberta equivalent, in a Facebook video question and answer session. (The subject starts at 40:45 of the recording.)

“I can certainly tell you that will be one of the issues studied by the panel that I will be appointing to consult with Albertans on fighting for a fair deal in Canada,” Kenney says in the video.

“I believe that a compelling case can be made for such a shift. We want to listen to Albertans on this first, but let me just say that with the youngest population in Canada, we are by far the largest net contributors to the CPP.

[…]

See Also:

(1) Trudeau ramps up his Kiss Alberta Goodbye strategy

(2) County passes resolution that calls for possible Alberta independence vote

(3) Re-election means never having to say you’re sorry

(4) Justin Trudeau, George Soros and the Corporate destruction of the Canadian Nation State

(5) Canadians have low expectations for Trudeau’s economic plan: Poll

Loading