July 20, 2024
Hong Kong Government Formally Withdraws Extradition Bill That Ignited Protests
Anti-government protesters gather at the start of a protest march in Hong Kong’s tourism district of Tsim Sha Tsui, China, October 20, 2019.
Anti-government protesters gather at the start of a protest march in Hong Kong’s tourism district of Tsim Sha Tsui, China, October 20, 2019.

Hong Kong’s government on Wednesday formally pulled the extradition bill that ignited months of violent pro-democracy protests.

“I formally announce the withdrawal of the bill,” Secretary for Security John Lee announced to the Chinese territory’s legislature, citing “conflicts in society” as his justification.

Hong Kong has been roiled by protests throughout the summer, originally sparked by outrage over the extradition law, which Hong Kong residents say would allow Chinese authorities to effectively “kidnap” them with little evidence of criminality.

However, the concern over the law has ballooned into fear that China plans to throw out its “One Country, Two Systems” policy regarding Hong Kong — and the withdrawal of the bill is unlikely to curb the protests.

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See Also:

(1) Hong Kong’s China critics face targeted ‘white terror’ attacks

(2) Hong Kong police groups slam university head for publishing arrested students’ ‘unverified accusations’ of mistreatment

(3) Hong Kong police assoc. wins injunction application barring public from checking voter registers

(4) China plans to replace Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam – report

(5) Hong Kong travel agencies to receive up to HK$60k in subsidies following drop in tourist numbers

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