July 20, 2024
Maxime Bernier wants to be seen as a conservative in a hurry
Voters on Canada’s right now face the same dilemma voters on its left have struggled with for decades. Good luck with your choice, conservatives.
Voters on Canada’s right now face the same dilemma voters on its left have struggled with for decades. Good luck with your choice, conservatives.

If you’re a conservative, you’ve probably got a checklist of things you believe. Let’s see how, in his 2,273 words in Monday night’s debate, Maxime Bernier stacks up. (Yes, I did count. The other leaders had: Scheer 4,037, Trudeau 3,824, Singh 3,780, May 3,446 and Blanchet 2,254. The transcript records two interventions by “Unidentified male” but I didn’t count those.)

Mind you, there’s more to Bernier than what he said Monday night. He had a mixed record as a federal minister, great in Industry, not so good in Foreign Affairs, where his relaxed view of document security got him canned. Forming his own party may well have been an act of personal pique — albeit well-earned pique after the Conservative leadership was snatched away from him by the dairy cartel. And his new party has attracted support from decidedly unsavoury sorts. In 10 days, voters will be judging his full bio, just as they will with the other candidates. But for now, let’s look at what he did say Tuesday.

What did Bernier say?

“The UN is a dysfunctional organization.” Few conservatives will disagree.

“Extreme multiculturalism … is not the way to build this country.” Diversity is fine, it’s welcome, in fact, but policies that reinforce ethnic separateness are not.

[Read It All]

See Also:

(1) How to really fix these awful leaders’ debates — let the free market thrive

(2) Decades of idiotic environmental predictions

Loading