June 17, 2024
San Francisco, where felons are 'justice-involved' and there's no shame in crime
In this June 6, 2018 file photo, mayoral candidate and Board of Supervisors President London Breed speaks to reporters in San Francisco. Breed was poised to become the first African-American woman to lead San Francisco following a hard-fought campaign when a former state senator conceded and congratulated her Wednesday, June 13, more than a week after the election.
In this June 6, 2018 file photo, mayoral candidate and Board of Supervisors President London Breed speaks to reporters in San Francisco. Breed was poised to become the first African-American woman to lead San Francisco following a hard-fought campaign when a former state senator conceded and congratulated her Wednesday, June 13, more than a week after the election.

San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors just adopted a resolution recommending that felons not be called felons but rather “formerly incarcerated person” or former “justice-involved” person or “returning resident” — or any other number of soft and fuzzy names that won’t hurt the feelings of the, umm, felons.

File this under Ridiculous.

“We don’t want people to be forever labeled for the worst things that they have done,” Supervisor Matt Haney said to the San Francisco Chronicle. “We want them ultimately to become contributing citizens, and referring to them as felons is like a scarlet letter that they can never get away from.”

OK.

First off, Haney does have a point.

He has a point, in that wayward teens who commit stupid crimes that years ago would’ve been considered misdemeanors — or handled outside the court system, by concerned cops and parents — are nowadays slapped with felon charges, forever to face felon repercussions.

But name-changing the system won’t cure that problem.

That’s a problem of the criminal justice system. That’s a problem of the broken homes and families and societal ills that come from kids being raised without dads, without direction, without God, and the growing frustrations of the judiciary to deal with these rising rates of juvenile offenses.

But rather than addressing those real issues, San Francisco’s going a different direction.

San Francisco’s trying to change the duck simply by calling the duck by a different name.

[…]

See Also:

(1) Seattle residents blame inefficient elected officials for homeless problem, say they’ve ‘lost faith’ in system

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