June 14, 2024
Why repealing the Multiculturalism Act makes sense
By pursuing multicultural globalism (instead of bicultural nationalism) along with mass immigration (which by 1988 had tripled compared to just five years earlier), Ottawa embarked on remaking Canada into a ‘nation of nations’.
By pursuing multicultural globalism (instead of bicultural nationalism) along with mass immigration (which by 1988 had tripled compared to just five years earlier), Ottawa embarked on remaking Canada into a ‘nation of nations’.

“The Canadian Multiculturalism Act is in many senses an ill-considered document, focused so squarely on today that it ignores tomorrow.” So said Trinidad-born Neil Bissoondath 25 years ago in his bestselling book Selling Illusions; a stinging critique of Canada’s misguided experiment with official multiculturalism. The statement’s even more relevant today. 

Which is why my leader, MP Maxime Bernier, this past week called for the Act’s repeal during a rally in Mississauga where he introduced the People’s Party of Canada’s platform on immigration and integration. Although the other parties won’t admit it, Canada’s becoming an increasingly difficult place for newcomers to integrate and assimilate. For the sake of keeping Canada a viable, cohesive nation, this has to change.

The Canadian people agree. A 2016 CBC-Angus Reid poll found almost 70% of Canadians want minorities to “fit in” and assimilate more. A Forum Research poll from that same year showed two-thirds of Canadians saying immigrants should be screened for anti-Canadian values. And in 2015, an EKOS poll found 41% of Canadians simply thought fewer visible minorities should be coming in order to hasten stronger integration. Meanwhile, more recent polls show much frustration over refugees and immigration in general.

These results capture the frustration citizens rightly feel when their elected leaders create laws based on hope, not reality. When the Multiculturalism Act was enshrined in law in 1988 (building on Pierre Trudeau’s earlier policies), Canada became the first nation in the world committed to “enhance multiculturalism”, and to ensure that immigrants could “keep their identities.” Even though immigrants by their very coming here show at least some willingness to integrate into a new society, by adopting the Act, Ottawa chose to elevate ethnic divisions above national unity. 

[…]

See Also:

(1) Bernier’s problems with multiculturalism cannot be dismissed

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Paul
Paul
July 28, 2019 8:24 am

and people think the un is a circus. Merkel stated just a few years ago, “multicuturalism doesn’t work”. Talk about the mother of flipflops. Was the about face really about german guilty feelings over ww2. Not.
This is here and there about the puppets and their masters. Canadian decisions are not being made in the interest of the people because they are most likely made by non canadian power brokers and their canadian pawns. Years ago lucien bouchard commented canada was not a real country. To say, at the time, I was livid is to understate my reaction. Now, not so much. More and more comes to light and the great facades are revealed.
This modern malaise is indeed modern. It dates back to trudeau the elder. It dates back to the sixties and the first solid foot holds of cultural marxism. We, today, are just out of the gates as we ride the political, cultural, economic dragon. This isn’t going to end well for Canada.