June 14, 2024
My country, I’m afraid, has begun to lose its integrity as a nation-state under the utterly inept regime of Nicolás Maduro.
The challenge of gluing back this shattered jar resembles that of the slow steps that took place in the first decades of the 20th century.
The challenge of gluing back this shattered jar resembles that of the slow steps that took place in the first decades of the 20th century.

Look at the world map. Right there, in the Northern tip of South America, irrigated by abundant rivers and refreshed by the trade winds. We used to hear at school that Venezuela was blessed with eternal spring, rich soil and all kinds of wonderful landscapes.

Now look closer. That country with the shape of a mutilated rhinoceros became synonymous with catastrophe in the Americas. From abroad, Venezuela means columns of migrants, clouds of tear gas, swarms of famished people scavenging on the trash for rotten food. 

What’s harder to see, even for those living there, is how the country we have known as Venezuela is changing, not only because it fell to the last places on every serious ranking of human rights, the economy or quality of life, but also because its inner demographic dynamics and its real borders are going through an uncertain process of reconfiguration. 

My country, I’m afraid, has begun to lose its integrity as a nation-state under the utterly inept regime of Nicolás Maduro.  

[…]

See Also:

(1) The Lost Harvest of Chinese Food Plants in Venezuela

(2) UN report should prove awkward for Maduro’s ‘progressive’ Canadian supporters

(3) New video shines light on massacre of indigenous group by Venezuelan government

(4) Venezuela: Juan Guaido’s bodyguards arrested

(5) With tenacity and torture, Venezuela’s awful regime is hanging on


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