June 17, 2024
It’s not Doug Ford's duty to rescue Bombardier from its ineptitude
A company whose survival depends on an endless stream of government orders is not a model of commercial success.
A company whose survival depends on an endless stream of government orders is not a model of commercial success.

News that a Bombardier plant in Thunder Bay, Ont., would lay off almost half its staff due to a shortage of orders had barely broke when federal and provincial leaders were at each others throats over who was to blame.

Liberal federal Employment Minister Patty Hajdu claimed Ontario hadn’t come through with promised projects for the plant. Progressive Conservative Premier Doug Ford fired back that he had a $28.5 billion plan but had heard nothing from Ottawa. The feds retorted that money was available, but Ontario had to apply for it. The province claimed it sent Ottawa a list of 49 projects needing cash. Sure, responded Infrastructure Minister François Philippe Champagne, but Ontario only sent “flashy pictures,” not a real plan.

Which camp deserves the award for most kindergarten-like behaviour remains open. With the Liberals in full re-election mode and Ford’s PCs pledged to non-co-operation with the Trudeau government, neither side deserves much admiration on this file. That, unfortunately, has become the norm in a political environment in which opponents are enemies to be derided and scorned at all costs, including the public good. But it’s of particular note in the case of Bombardier and the long, costly soap opera that started with a contract for some streetcars a decade ago. Since its start, it has been a saga steeped in pure politics, and little else. Latest events suggest an opportunity to end the foolishness may be missed.

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See Also:

(1) New poll says Liberals still have strong hold on ‘Fortress Toronto’ (Ed: The Star, as usual, is full of bullshit)

(2) Why tearing up the Beer Store deal is good for business

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