June 17, 2024
Jason Kenney is filling the foreign policy void left by Justin Trudeau
Alberta’s premier is fulfilling the role of a prime minister by strengthening alliances and protecting the country’s reputation and its economy from our rivals.
Alberta’s premier is fulfilling the role of a prime minister by strengthening alliances and protecting the country’s reputation and its economy from our rivals.

It took a crisis — COVID-19 — to reveal that many Canadian premiers and American governors are dramatically better leaders than either country’s current federal incumbents.

In Canada, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney stands out not only for managing the pandemic well, but also for filling the foreign policy and economic vacuum left by Canada’s hapless prime minister, who has spent far too much time and energy pursuing a useless United Nations Security Council seat, at the expense of our national interests. By contrast, Premier Kenney has been proactively doing what good foreign policy dictates: unequivocally condemning China for its misdeeds and proposing that Canada distance itself from Beijing, while pursuing deeper integration with the United States in manufacturing, medical equipment and energy. He has also been making the rounds in Washington to protect our economic interests.

“The irresponsible actions of Russia and Saudi (Arabia) clearly have been trying to permanently impair the North American energy industry and one of my goals has been to remind folks in Washington that Canada is part of the solution and not the problem,” he said in an exclusive interview with the National Post. “I spoke with the U.S. energy secretary, Congress, Senate and House energy committees, and leading energy business leaders to advocate for a co-ordinated approach away from allowing OPEC to dump its dictator oil here.”

Discussions there ranged from a “co-ordinated Canada-U.S. tariff on foreign imports, that might exclude Mexico,” to “some kind of a co-ordinated (bilateral) price until OPEC+ agreed to reduce production,” said Kenney.  He said that there was significant interest in these ideas, and congressional sources have told me that the idea of imposing common tariffs on foreign oil is gaining traction.

(In 2019, Canada exported four million barrels a day to the U.S. and was more than capable of helping replace the two million barrels that America imported from OPEC countries that year.)

[Interesting Read]

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