June 14, 2024
Hooray and good riddance.
As far as political obituaries go, Mrs. May is survived by the disintegrated remains of the Tories and populist drain (the Brexit party). How’s that for a legacy?
As far as political obituaries go, Mrs. May is survived by the disintegrated remains of the Tories and populist drain (the Brexit party). How’s that for a legacy?

On Friday, Theresa May, perhaps the worst Conservative prime minister in recent history, announced her resignation outside of number 10 Downing Street. She will step down effective June 7.

“I have done my best,” she insisted. “I have done everything I can. . . . I believe it was right to persevere even when the odds against success seemed high.” She went on:

For many years, the great humanitarian Sir Nicholas Winton, who saved the lives of hundreds of children by arranging their evacuation from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia through Kindertransport, was my constituent in Maidenhead. At another time of political controversy, a few years before his death, he took me to one side at a local event and gave me a piece of advice.

He said: “Never forget that compromise is not a dirty word. Life depends on compromise.” He was right.

As we strive to find the compromises we need in our politics, whether to deliver Brexit or restore devolved government in Northern Ireland, we must remember what brought us here.

But what did bring us here; here, this unfortunate place of constitutional crisis and extreme polarization? Was it, as Mrs. May suggests, forces beyond her control, or was it three years of her incompetent leadership?

[…]

See Also:

(1) Theresa May ‘Britain’s WORST Prime Minister in HISTORY’ says Brexit Party’s Nigel Farage

(2) Brexit SHOCK: Cameron reveals he has been ‘HELPING’ Theresa May in Brexit negotiations

(3) European elections: Corbyn’s DISASTER as Labour poised for worse election day in 35 YEARS

(4) ANOTHER leader resigns: Just like May, Vince Cable to FINALLY quit after CLINGING ON

(5) Could the European elections herald the end of the EU, asks Ross Clark

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